51 The genomic history of Southeastern Europe (Mathieson et al. 2017 preprint), czyli północna droga R1a rządzi!!! :-)

UWAGA!!! BARDZO WAŻNY WPIS!!!

Dla mnie ten wpis to kolejny dowód na:

a) śmierć „południowej drogi R1a”, bo brak jest R1a na Bałkanach, Anatolii, itp,

b) śmierć Anatolii jako kolebki tzw. PIE, czyli także i języka tzw. PIE,

c) coś dziwnego dzieje się rolnikami z Bałkanów, bo okazują się wcale nie być aż tak anatolijscy, tylko 2000 lat wcześniej zmieszani z hodowcami ze stepu,

d) no i zaczyna się dyskusja nad około 10,500 starym R1a na stepie (Vasilievka)  i w Karelii,

e) no i to samo dotyczy R1b znalezionego w Dereivka, ale przede wszystkim na zachód od stepu… czyli R1b jako, że mieszało się wcześniej z innymi ludami, nie tak jak R1a… to zatraciło np. wiele ze swojego… hm…  „pierwotnego?” języka…        


Folker said…
I find extremely interesting: „early farmers from southern Greece are not descended from the Neolithic population of northwestern Anatolia that was ancestral to all other European farmers”.
May 10, 2017 at 5:07 AM

Gioiello said…
„intermittent steppe ancestry” intermittent doesn’t mean „massive”, I’d say it means „a little” let that I say that, being this word of Latin origin. good-by R-L51 from the East. good-by Samara
May 10, 2017 at 5:15 AM

bellbeakerblogger said…
‚Intermittent’ sounds like pockets of foreigners. Varna elite = Lower Volga? Question is if they are like later Yamnaya?
May 10, 2017 at 5:57 AM

batman said…
According to geography and the alledged bifurication of R1, Varna ‚elite’ should rather relate to a West Side Story of Lower Vistula.
May 10, 2017 at 6:30 AM

Suevi said…
I1819 (8825-8561 calBCE (9420±50 BP, Poz-81128), Ukraine_Mesolithic, Vasil’evka) – R1a
May 10, 2017 at 7:14 AM

Romulus said…
LOTS OF R1B IN MESOLITHIC BALKANS
May 10, 2017 at 7:28 AM

Roy King said…
Amazing! Much R1b1a in Balkans!
May 10, 2017 at 7:28 AM

Arza said…
@ EastPole
Ukraine Eneolithic 3500 BCE I4110 from Dereivka looks like a modern Balto-Slav (Figure 1.)
May 10, 2017 at 7:28 AM

Karl_K said…
It’s nice to have enough samples that you can actually get a sense of the variety of mixing between cultures, and the regional differences in genetics. Lots of unexpected stuff here.
May 10, 2017 at 7:49 AM

Slumbery said…
About a much debated topic: it looks like GAC had no „Steppe”, it appears as a typical farmer population, but with elevated (25%) WHG. Also Comb Ware is EHG and assimilating the previous WHG-heavy groups in the Baltic.
May 10, 2017 at 7:58 AM

Karl_K said…
@Slumbery And some Comb Ware were close to 100% EHG. Very interesting that they were so isolated for so long.
May 10, 2017 at 8:03 AM

Romulus said…
Varna man belonged to Y DNA CT, what a let down, guess his golden condom ended that Y line. Other Varna are 2x G2a and 1 R1.
May 10, 2017 at 7:59 AM

Davidski said…
@Karl_K R1a is an EHG marker, native to Eastern Europe. It did not migrate there with CHG.
May 10, 2017 at 9:21 AM

irjhar007 said…
R1a is an EHG marker, native to Eastern Europe

To be neutral you can’t connect autosome with Hgs directly . But obviously we are not worried about M417- clines , they were there all over Eurasia from Meso to Early Neo , we will have to see how the pattern of M417 + emerges. I also think Meso India will also show lots of R1a M417 – , but again it will not matter much to the IE question, to which M417 can be somewhat faithfully connected. Now it turns for the Mycenaean and Maykop , very very crucial and of course India.
May 10, 2017 at 9:30 AM

Davidski said…
@Nirjhar I also think Meso India will also show lots of R1a M417-. You’re totally nuts. Take some pills and go and lie down for a while.
May 10, 2017 at 9:35 AM

http://eurogenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/05/the-genomic-history-of-southeastern.html

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

The genomic history of Southeastern Europe (Mathieson et al. 2017 preprint)

Over at BioRxiv at this LINK:

Abstract: Farming was first introduced to southeastern Europe in the mid-7th millennium BCE – brought by migrants from Anatolia who settled in the region before spreading throughout Europe. However, the dynamics of the interaction between the first farmers and the indigenous hunter-gatherers remain poorly understood because of the near absence of ancient DNA from the region. We report new genome-wide ancient DNA data from 204 individuals-65 Paleolithic and Mesolithic, 93 Neolithic, and 46 Copper, Bronze and Iron Age-who lived in southeastern Europe and surrounding regions between about 12,000 and 500 BCE. We document that the hunter-gatherer populations of southeastern Europe, the Baltic, and the North Pontic Steppe were distinctive from those of western Europe, with a West-East cline of ancestry. We show that the people who brought farming to Europe were not part of a single population, as early farmers from southern Greece are not descended from the Neolithic population of northwestern Anatolia that was ancestral to all other European farmers. The ancestors of the first farmers of northern and western Europe passed through southeastern Europe with limited admixture with local hunter-gatherers, but we show that some groups that remained in the region mixed extensively with local hunter-gatherers, with relatively sex-balanced admixture compared to the male-biased hunter-gatherer admixture that we show prevailed later in the North and West. After the spread of farming, southeastern Europe continued to be a nexus between East and West, with intermittent steppe ancestry, including in individuals from the Varna I cemetery and associated with the Cucuteni-Trypillian archaeological complex, up to 2,000 years before the Steppe migration that replaced much of northern Europe’s population.

Mathieson et al., The Genomic History Of Southeastern Europe, bioRxiv, Posted May 9, 2017, doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/135616

See also…

Globular Amphora people starkly different from Yamnaya people

The Bell Beaker Behemoth (Olalde et al. 2017 preprint)

Posted by Davidski at 12:04:00 AM

Rob said…
Boom
May 10, 2017 at 4:26 AM

Nirjhar007 said…
so Varna was R1b with Steppe ADMIXTURE???
May 10, 2017 at 4:34 AM

AWood said…
This paper looks equally exciting to the BB one…
May 10, 2017 at 4:34 AM

Alberto said…
Yes, looks amazing this one too. I just don’t know how they manage to publish two huge papers on the very same day (after 2 years waiting). We’ll get crazy trying to get our heads around 400 new samples and following comments about both papers. No, I’m not complaining. This is a feast. But it’ll take time to digest all this new data. I’d recommend not to shoot too fast on the comments. With all this data, better to take is easy. At least it’s what I’ll try to do. Enjoy everyone!
May 10, 2017 at 4:53 AM

Arza said…
WHG moved to the steppe? Figure 1. WHG appears in Ukraine Neolithic while it was non existent in Mesolithic.
May 10, 2017 at 7:47 AM

Davidski said…
Three new Yamnaya, all from Ukraine, but sadly all females. Expected the Mesolithic/Neolithic R1a/R1b in Ukraine, and it would’ve been good to see some Yamnaya males from there, because some are likely to be R1a-M417. But it’s nice to see that Bulgarian MLBA R1a/U5a sample. Interesting date for R1a to be in the Balkans: 1750-1625 calBCE (3400±30 BP). Anyway, can’t wait to analyze these samples myself. What’s the earliest L51 in this dataset?
May 10, 2017 at 8:11 AM

Davidski said…
It can’t be a coincide that all of their Yamnaya samples from Ukraine are females. I reckon they’re holding the males back for their South Asian paper. I’m surprised they let the Bulgarian MLBA R1a out of the bag, because that’s a big clue about what we’ll see in BA Ukraine.
May 10, 2017 at 8:20 AM

ak2014b said…
Is this right? In their spreadsheet of everything aDNA, Ust Ishim (45530-40610 calBCE, mtDNA R*) has Y DNA R1a1a1b, which in the isogg tree is nowadays „S224/Z645, S441/Z647”. R1a1a1b being R1a1a1-M417, Ust-Ishim is already M417.
May 10, 2017 at 8:25 AM

Davidski said…
Obviously it’s a mistake. Try not to stretch this out into a massive discussion.
May 10, 2017 at 8:29 AM

ak2014b said…
I’m ready to agree that it’s obviously a mistake, but I’d like to have it stated officially by the people on the paper. Could you ask someone from Broad/Harvard to confirm it’s a mistake?
May 10, 2017 at 8:34 AM

Folker said…
It doesn’t seem that the results are against a Steppe PIE Homeland, quite the contrary. But, without some samples from Anatolia in a clear IE Anatolian context, it will be difficult to be sure. But if R1 a/b is rare in the Caucasus, as it is likely, the hypothesis of CHG = PIE would become very difficult to defend. It is hard to imagine a very patriarchal/patrilocal/patrilienal society, as deduced by linguists for PIE, tansmitted by women, with a very long duration (at least hundred of years, as CHG arised from 30% in Khvalynsk to 50% in Yamna). Not very convincing.
May 10, 2017 at 8:49 AM

Karl_K said…
@Davidski „R1a is an EHG marker, native to Eastern Europe. It did not migrate there with CHG.”
That was not my suggestion. But we also have no actual idea what language family EHG people spoke, and Uralic is an alternative. Why couldn’t CHG people have brought PIE into the R1a/R1b EHG populations? They obviously mixed extensively to become a new homogeneous population.
May 10, 2017 at 9:43 AM

Davidski said…
@Karl_KWhy couldn’t CHG people have brought PIE into the R1a/R1b EHG populations? They obviously mixed extensively to become a new homogeneous population. Because the early Indo-Europeans were highly patriarchal and patrilineal, with a vocabulary to match. And the the two Y-HGs that show the best correlation with supposed ancient Indo-Europeans as well as modern-day living Indo-Europeans are R1a and R1b. Typical CHG/Caucasus/South Caspian Y-HGs don’t get a look in. So unless the CHG/Iran_N adopted local EHG stepsons to take over the family business, as it were, then PIE has its origins in R1a/R1b groups on the steppe.
May 10, 2017 at 9:52 AM

Slumbery said…
Karl_K We are likely facing a huge survivorship-bias when it comes to the deep roots of language families. Probably neither IE nor Uralic is old enough to be the language of the EHG as it is. Comb Ware and Yamnaya separated from the post Ice Age re-population of East Europe by more time than they separated from us. There is no good reason to assume that there was no linguistic diversity in such a huge region after such long time (even assuming that the re-population had only one relatively homogeneous source, and that is already a strong assumption). We do not even know the geographical extent of the „EHG” into the east actually.
May 10, 2017 at 9:52 AM

Romulus said…
Farmers were patriarchal, the ORIGIN of elite patriarchal societies came from them, for example Varna man. Who we know definitively was a farmer. Steppe people were hunter gatherers before they had these advanced ideas introduced to them from the south, via EEF or CHG, it doesn’t matter, nothing originated on the Steppe.
May 10, 2017 at 10:32 AM

Dude ManBro said…
@Romulus, it would seem Varna had some steppe ancestry according to the new paper, although it may have been spotty and not homogeneous throughout the population.

„In a few individuals from southeastern Europe, we find evidence of steppe-related ancestry far earlier (defined here as a mixture of EHG and CHG similar to the genetic signature of individuals of the later Yamnaya; Figure 1B,D). One individual (ANI163) from the Varna I cemetery dates to 4711-4550 BCE, one (I2181) from nearby Smyadovo dates to 4550-4450 BCE, and a third individual (I1927) from Verteba cave, associated with the Cucuteni-Trypillian complex, dates to 3619-2936 BCE. These findings push back by almost 2000 years the first evidence of steppe ancestry this far West in Europe, demonstrating the resumption of genetic contact between southeastern Europe and the Steppe that also occurred in the Mesolithic.”
May 10, 2017 at 10:37 AM

Kurti said…
R1 too? Balkans look like a hotspot of R1 lineages so far. And enough diversity of R1b lineages contrary to Yamnaya
May 10, 2017 at 10:58 AM

Kurti said…
this kind of diversity of R1 lineages is only known on the Iranian Plateau, East Anatolia and South_Central Asia. However only with modern samples non ancient unfortunately. More samples would be good. Also nice to see that they stand with the Iran_CHL/Neo ancestry.
May 10, 2017 at 11:05 AM

Kurti said…
The authors dismiss the Balkan route for Anatolian languages out of the reasont that even during the Bronze Age Steppe ancestry was very rare and appeared only sporadicly across the Balkans with no connection to a culture. So like a few individuals got „lost” there. However despite this R1 linages all the way to Mesolithic/Paleolithic times. The Balkans are rivaling Mal’ta.
May 10, 2017 at 11:31 AM

Simon_W said…
Ha, Jesus, no R1b/R1a in GAC, they were pure I2, and neither were they steppe admixed.
May 10, 2017 at 11:36 AM

rch Hades said…
I cant believe these guys didnt sample the Mycenaeans or Minoans. What the hell? Will we ever get them? On another note..The Neolithic Peloponnese looks pretty similar to The Neolithic farmers from Greek Macedonia..only more Southern shifted/slightly less WHG shifted.
May 10, 2017 at 11:43 AM

Roy King said…
Very interesting that the Bronze Age Anatolian from near Isparta has Y-J1a. As mentioned, these samples could be speaking a substrate language to Luwian and later Lycian. There is much J1(xP58) in Western Anatolia in modern populations.
May 10, 2017 at 1:27 PM

EastPole said…
@Arza “Ukraine Eneolithic 3500 BCE I4110 from Dereivka looks like a modern Balto-Slav (Figure 1.)”
Ukraine Eneolithic 3500 BCE I4110 from Dereivka looks very interesting. It is a pity we don’t have Y-DNA. It is much later than other Dereivka samples who look like a bunch of HGs. Notice that it is on the line extending from Trypillia to Trypillia outlier: http://s22.postimg.org/inmma7oj5/screenshot_180.png

Maybe this line will lead us to some R1a PIE population from the steppe?
May 10, 2017 at 1:43 PM

batman said…
Karl_K said… „And some Comb Ware were close to 100% EHG. Very interesting that they were so isolated for so long.” Isolated? From whom or what?

The gothic Pit-ware and the finish Comb-ware were quite closely related already during NME/ENE – as they both related to the Atlantic Pontus at the inning of the Finnish Gulf to the great Volga – creating the major track of travel and trade bewteen Europe and Asia. This was populated and ran by the finns and used by the goths, too – creating the Pit-Com-Ware in the middle of the ancient north.

Which may explain why the first northern farmers could move into the Bay of Riga and the Gulf of Finland – carrying hgs like R1a and U4 – migrating from Sweden and Gotland to Narva and Oleni Ostrov and the lower Volga, Srubnaya and Sinthasta. Making various styles of corded ware as well as pitted and combed ware. Just like their somewhat older Scandiavian and East-European brotherlines.

Thus there’s a clsoe relation between the Scania-Motala-Ajvide population and the „EHG” (I2/I1 – U5b). Reflecting the close connection to the „WHG-motive” made from Motala-Loshbour. Which is why you find „unacounted substructures” in the rundowns using WHG and EHG both.

A similar close relationship is reflected in the „eastern” vs „western” farmers. As the Narva-pottery from Estland, with R1a1a/U4 is reflected in the CWC it’s also reflected in the female part of the Yamna-horizon, otherwise carried by an eastern branch of R1b. Due to the close conection between the R1a and R1b dynasties – that just like todays farmers from Sweden (R1a) and Denmark (R1b) – kept marrying their laborous daugthers to eachothers sons.

Thus we may explain the close mitocondrial connections between the early agriculturalists of Narva/R1a and Yamna/R1b. As well as the close y-connections between the early R1a-farmers of Sweden/Norway, Baltic/Carelia an the Srubnaya, Androvno and Sinthasta.

Thus the heartland of the 8.000 year old Comb-ware-culture were at the very helm of the old highways across Eurasia, untill Mercators time marking the border between ‚Europe’ and ‚Asia’. Not really that isolated, in other words…
May 10, 2017 at 2:48 PM

ellbeakerblogger said…
@Simon, „Ha, Jesus, no R1b/R1a in GAC, they were pure I2, and neither were they steppe admixed.”

That’s a bit curious because it theoretically could mean that the segment of Neolithic BBC/CWC ancestry that can be modeled as GAC/TRB could have happened much further east instead of North-Central Europe as is currently assumed. IOW, the CWC turnover in Northern Europe could have been much more extreme.
May 10, 2017 at 2:57 PM

Arza said…
@ EastPole I’m playing now with DoHA overlay… Trypillia outlier looks like Hungary BA I1504.
What is even better mysterious RISE568 apparently is also on this line. RISE568-like + Ukraine_N-like (Latvia MN?) will give Baltic BA, which fused with maybe again Hungary BA will give a cline from Czechs/Slovaks/UkrWest to Latvians. But how all of this connect to Indo-Iranians? And what about R1a CWC and possibly Yamnaya_Ukraine (totally different cline)? And this is genetics only… now think about languages. The only expected thing here is R1a on its way to Greece.
May 10, 2017 at 3:57 PM

EastPole said…
@Arza “But how all of this connect to Indo-Iranians? And what about R1a CWC and possibly Yamnaya_Ukraine (totally different cline)?”

Maybe this: Dereivka +Yamnaya = CWC –> Sintashta/Andronovo –> Indo-Iranians:

http://s22.postimg.org/m0zgao7ht/screenshot_182.png
May 10, 2017 at 4:25 PM

Folker said…
@Rob „All in all there is no denonstrable „steppe migration” to the Balkans”
Yes, if you consider an early migration around 4000 BC. But the Anatolian languages are only attested after 2000 BC, not before. It is therefore likely (and consistant with History, as related in Assyrian sources) that Anatolian IE speakers were intrusive in Anatolia in the Bronze Age. Hatti were not IE, and Hittites arose to power only around 1600 BC (and very little is know about them before, if any). Divergence between Luwian and Hittite could be anterior to their migration into Anatolia. And frankly, given what we know about Anatolian languages geography arond 1200 BC, they could have come from the East, rather than by the Balkans. The big difficulty is always the same: the IE tree says that Anatolian branch is the first to diverge from the common PIE. So, I think that the only way to know will be to find some Hittite genome, if it could be identified as ethnically Hittite (not so easy, if, as I understand, they assimilated Hatti and others non-IE).
May 10, 2017 at 4:36 PM

Davidski said…
Breaking news! Ust’-Ishim doesn’t really belong to Y-HG R1a. There was a mistake in the spreadsheet and it’ll be fixed very soon. Please report all other such errors to the authors via bioRxiv and/or e-mail, and they’ll be corrected ASAP.
May 10, 2017 at 4:54 PM

Arza said…
@ EastPole Hmm, but in CWC Germany we have samples from Beaker-like to almost Yamnaya-like (I1536, I1538). They are apparently blending into local farmers. This would work flawlessly in case of hypothetical CWC Russia, but they were on the „wrong” side in Germany.
May 10, 2017 at 5:07 PM

Arza said…
@ Folker „the IE tree says that Anatolian branch is the first to diverge from the common PIE.”
This tree is obviously wrong as almost everything in the „reconstructions”.
May 10, 2017 at 5:14 PM

batman said…
Colin Welling „I never liked the patriarchal language argument for genetics. I remember a few years back when you argued that because PIE was patriarchal and because early IE groups were associated with R1a, we therefore wouldnt find any r1b in PIE. Turns out that was wrong.”

It’s a fact that both R1a and b was patrilineal, patrilocal and patriarchic. You can’t be one without being both others. Without any of them you won’t get any linearity at all – which is why it had to exist.

Some millenia ago everybody understood that. Which is why all old laws built on „natural principles” where the first was that ‚right’ was defined by birth – as the first son and daugther would inherrit distinct functions – and thus positions and duties. Depending on the size of the family and their farm the number of siblings would vary. On large and central farms, as a manor or estate, there could be 20-30 sons and daugters required to meet the demands for production, communication and trade. Besides a number of socio-political duties as a part of greater whole, as in a kingdom.

To form a law of the land you need to define HOW the next king is going to be appoingted. Thus it was ONLY the FIRST son of the present king that could get the chrown. Which explains titles like chrownprince. Now from there you can build a Constitution and thus a Constututional Tradition, which by default become a „state of being”. To ensure stability, development and progress one needs a Constitutional Law, engulfing ALL men in the kingdom with rights and plights. Ensuring that only „Right” would give „Might” – rather than the inverse, where one risk ending in lawlessness anytime.

We may like or dislike political systems. But we can’t use myoptic likes and dislikes to analyze motives and reasons behind historical realities.
May 10, 2017 at 5:41 PM

Rob said…
@ Folker Hittites are first attested 2300 BC bud. By the time of attestation of all other Anatolian languages c. mid 2nd millenium, they were so differentiated that they require divergence for at least 2000 years. Coupled with that. The only demographic & settlement shift occurring in Anatolia is c. 4000 BC. You should be aware of these important facts if you want to enter debate, which is why there is little wriggle room. Also, the Bronze Age Anatolians were from western Anatolia. Not many Hurrians or Hatti there I’m afraid

And yes we have steppe individuals in the Balkans too. But they just seem individual migrants and traders; and EHG ancestry existed since the Mesolithic; and Balkans seems one source for the eventual steppe lines. So there is a long history of mutual exchange there. Undoubtedly the classic Kurgan hypothesis is incorrect.
May 10, 2017 at 6:32 PM

John Smith said…
I was wrong about the Trypillian culture having R1b, but I was correct about ancient SE Europeans having R1b and of my SE European/Italy or just (SE European not any new data from Italy) refugium theory that I created due to the presence of R1b in Villabruna.

They had one western Yamna from Bulgaria on the opposite side of the Yamna influence and he had a similar I as the Russian Yamna. You can see how all Corded Ware almost (almost all NOT all) have R1a thousands of miles from each other and how Bell Beakers except those in Iberia have the same type of R1b , with even the Iberian Bell Beakers having 2/7 R1b which is a lot and enough to explain a connection (unless its V88 than that would be a coincidence). The Yamna there is no doubt in my mind had little or no R1a and were dominated by R1b-L23 (Z2105/2103)(and maybe I) and had little or no R1b-L151/P310 these groups tend to have all the same lines and even though more than just one West Yamna will be needing to confirm this hypothesis, I think it is pretty much set in stone from the pattern of everything else. Perhaps the Yamna were the ancestors of Europeans in between (Autosomes) but I seriously doubt the modern R1a and R1b comes from the Yamna. I am starting to sense a Yamnn y-chromosome ancestor confirmation bias. I would love to be a direct male descendant of the Yamna and I really hope there is a new study but it isnt looking good. And BTW if any scientist (I.E David Reich) knows I am wrong please let me know. PS was the other paper the Bell Beaker Behemoth? I thought it would be larger.
May 10, 2017 at 8:13 PM

Folker said…
@Rob „Hittites are first attested 2300 BC bud.”

To my knowledge, it’s Hatti which was attested from 2300BC, not Hittites. The confusion lies in the use of the name Hatti by Hittites, because they took control of the Hatti around 1700/1600 BC. But Hattians were non IE, contrary to the Hittites.

„By the time of attestation of all other Anatolian languages c. mid 2nd millenium, they were so differentiated that they require divergence for at least 2000 years.”

That’s the main difficulty, and I let it to linguists. But differentiation must not to have occured in Anatolia. It could have been the result of common migration of Anatolian IE speakers in Anatolia after 2000BC. We have other examples of the sort, like with Germans in the Roman Empire. So differentiation is not synomim with early arrival.

Hittites, in the Assyrians texts, are seen as an intrusive population, before they took over Hatti. So probably recent in Anatolia.

„Coupled with that. The only demographic & settlement shift occurring in Anatolia is c. 4000 BC.”

No. There are hints of population shift around 2000 BC. For example, there is discontinuity between the last Chalcolithic settlement in Barcin, and the first Hittite settlement (200 years later).

„Also, the Bronze Age Anatolians were from western Anatolia. Not many Hurrians or Hatti there I’m afraid”.

Clear. West Anatolia is known to have been in relation with non-IE cultures, so not the best place to find IE. That’s the problem, even if I don’t understand your reference to Hatti, as they have nothing to do with IE.

„So there is a long history of mutual exchange there. Undoubtedly the classic Kurgan hypothesis is incorrect.”

We are completly agree on that.
May 10, 2017 at 10:41 PM

Ric Hern said…
What is interesting for me is the R1a, R1b and I2a found at Vasil’evka and the then also some 3000 years later we see R1a, R1b and I2a just a little bit North at Derievka. I wonder if this points towards continual contact and interaction between these people for at least 2000 years. Enough time to swap some words….? Did GAC I2a and Corded Ware R1a expand from this area ? Who were the R1bs that expanded from this area ? Derievka is after all within Sredny Stog Cultural area….
May 11, 2017 at 2:02 AM

Alberto said…
Not time to look at all yet, but a few things that I didn’t see too explicitly in the comments:

– The Anatolian Bronze Age samples are said to be published in Lazaridis 2017. So that must be an upcoming study with the other Asian samples (Maykop, BMAC, Swat Valley?). These samples have a strong shift towards Iranian ancestry (Supplementary Table 2), which together with what they write in their conclusions does seem to support that they’re moving to a different model with a homeland in Asia. Let’s see.

– Peloponnese Greek samples are interestingly not shifted (compared to Anatolian ones) towards Levant Neolithic, but towards Iran Neolithic too. No idea why (also sup. Table 2).

– Balkans Bronze Age: Yes, some variable steppe admixture, but no R1b and just one R1a outlier.
In the single Iron Age sample, steppe ancestry falls to half, and WHG ancestry to 0.2% (Sup. Table 4).

– From Sup. Table 5, it seems that the autosomes vs. X chromosome estimates using qpAdm don’t really work well, so we can’t get good clues there about the origin of R1b. Strange that with all these samples and the ones from the BB paper the origin of R1b-L23 (and L51) is still unknown. And still no Neolithic Italian samples…

We’ll need more time to look into all of this, but it’s strange that so many samples didn’t bring much more clear answers to many questions. Sampling looks a bit random, probably because of what Nick Patterson explained. I hope that Lazaridis 2017 paper will settle more questions.
May 11, 2017 at 2:29 AM

Davidski said…
And these in Anatolia as well Armenia show no sign of EHG admixture.

Bullshit alert. Armenia_Chalcolithic shows about 20% of EHG.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9o3EYTdM8lQLXZIdUpyV3RQWTA/view?usp=sharing
May 11, 2017 at 4:43 AM

Rob said…
@ Folker
1) „To my knowledge, it’s Hatti which was attested from 2300BC, not Hittites. The confusion lies in the use of the name Hatti by Hittites, because they took control of the Hatti around 1700/1600 BC. But Hattians were non IE, contrary to the Hittites.”

Yes but by 2300 BC the land of the Hatti was the Hittites. It had already happened, the strata are quite clear at the site.

2) R: „By the time of attestation of all other Anatolian languages c. mid 2nd millenium, they were so differentiated that they require divergence for at least 2000 years.”

F: „That’s the main difficulty, and I let it to linguists. But differentiation must not to have occured in Anatolia. It could have been the result of common migration of Anatolian IE speakers in Anatolia after 2000BC. We have other examples of the sort, like with Germans in the Roman Empire. So differentiation is not synomim with early arrival. „

Aren’t you a linguist ? 🙂 Hold on, but that’s a bit unlikely, I mean how did it turn out that every one that went out happened to speak Anatolian, but were otherwise already distinct languages. And how is it IE reached NW Europe as a common Italo-Celtic-Ligurian etc clade, one Balto-Slavic, and one or two at best I-A migrations, but 5 for Anatolia ? And didn;t the GErmanic migrations into the ROman Empire result in language loss ?

3) „Hittites, in the Assyrians texts, are seen as an intrusive population, before they took over Hatti. So probably recent in Anatolia.”

Well it actually says that they took over Kanesh specifically. That they took over all of central Anatolia at the same time seems to be your interpolation.

4) „There are hints of population shift around 2000 BC. For example, there is discontinuity between the last Chalcolithic settlement in Barcin, and the first Hittite settlement (200 years later).”

I agree, there are indications of some conflicts and changes at this time also. But I think the major change was in c. 4000 BCs.

5) R: „Also, the Bronze Age Anatolians were from western Anatolia. Not many Hurrians or Hatti there I’m afraid”.

„F: Clear. West Anatolia is known to have been in relation with non-IE cultures'”

Yes i think these were the maritime Aegean cultures which were non-IE, eg Minoans, etc.
I think mainland Anatolia was solidly IE. A lot of the supposedly non-IE substrata in Anatolian has been overestimated. Virtually all their institutions appear to be native Luwian, Hittite, etc.

I suspect whatever is in print with Lazaridis et al. will outline West Asia more clearly, including Majkop perhaps. I think perhaps for now I should try to absorb more of what this means for Europe.
May 11, 2017 at 4:48 AM

Ric Hern said…
@David Are the R1a,R1b and I2a in Vasil’evka and +-2000 years later in Derievka related to each other ? Does this point to Genetic continuity within that area ? If so, could it not point towards the formation of Proto-Indo-European between 7000 and 4000 BCE within that area ?
May 11, 2017 at 5:05 AM

Folker said…
@Rob I’m sorry because you are making a confusion between Hattians and Hittites, for obvious reasons (confusion made in the XIXth century, and because the take-over of Hatti territories by Hittites didn’t change the name of the place, stil designed as the Land of Hatti).
But Hattic, the langue of Hattians, is partially known even if it’s an isolate (as Hurrian), and it is not a IE language (as an example, it was agglutinative, so not fusional as the Hittite/Nesite and the large majority of IE languages). Frankly, there is no doubt about this, and very little that Anatolia was overwhelming Hattian and Hurrian in the late IIId millenium BC.

The relation of the birth of the Hittite kingdom is very interesting, as the known text show a conflict between two branchs of a same royal house, one of them with Hattian names, the other with IE names. During the conflict, Kanesh was destroyed and Hattusa became the capital of the new, unified kingdom (it’s only a resume of the text itself). If you read between the lines, it seems there was a conflict between Hattians (non IE) and Hittites (IE). The Hittites won, and absorbed the Hattians (Hattic became extinct shortly after) and a large part of their culture.

So, it does seem that some IE speakers (of the Anatolian branch)became sufficiently numerous in Kanesh to impose their language to their Hattian king, and finally conquered all the land of Hatti, before conquering nearly all Anatolia, and absorbing the defeated, and imposing their culture (admixed with Hattian culture) and language. The fondation of the Hittite Kingdom is usally dated from the XVIIth or XVIth centurirs BC.

The Kanesh IE pety kingdom could have been relatively small (probably a city-state), and doesn’t need any mass migration. A comparison could also be make with Rome(1000 years later) and its relations to Etruscans (roman royal house was Etruscan, and Romans adopted many cultural customs from them). If you making a confusion between Hattic and Hittite/Nesite, between a non-IE language, and an IE language, how could you try to find a solution to the Anatolian languages?
May 11, 2017 at 6:15 AM

Rob said…
@ Folker „I’m sorry because you are making a confusion between Hattians and Hittites, for obvious reasons (confusion made in the XIXth century, and because the take-over of Hatti territories by Hittites didn’t change the name of the place, stil designed as the Land of Hatti).
But Hattic, the langue of Hattians, is partially known even if it’s an isolate (as Hurrian), and it is not a IE language (as an example, it was agglutinative, so not fusional as the Hittite/Nesite and the large majority of IE languages).”

No, I am not . The „Land of the Hatti” was continued to be used in the Hittite period.
The Hittites arrived c 2300 BC because there are no subsequent destructions. This has been physically explored.

From Bryce:
„”But our main focus will be on central Anatolia. Here developed a
number of prosperous settlements, presumably the nuclei of small
kingdoms, in a region extending from just below the southern bend of
the river now known as the Kızıl Irmak (Red River)3 northwards
towards the Pontic zone along the southern shore of the Black Sea.

Prominent amongst these settlements was the site now known as Alaca
Ho¨yu¨k, which lies some 180 kilometres north-east of the modern
Turkish capital Ankara. The settlement which was founded here in the
Late Chalcolithic period reached its peak in the Early Bronze II phase, as
illustrated by its thirteen ‘royal’ shaft graves and their spectacular grave
goods, generally dated to c.2300–2100. But it continued as a flourishing
community to the end of the Late Bronze Age. Its Bronze Age
name is unknown, though Hittite Arinna, city of the Sun-Goddess, is
possibly to be identified with it. Other important settlements were
Hattus, the site of the later Hittite capital Hattusa, Alis¸ar lying 80
kilometres to the south-east of Hattus (and probably the ancient
Ankuwa6), Zalpa, which lay in the Pontic region, and Kanesh.
The last of these, Kanesh, is located in the fertile Kayseri Plain just
south of the southern bend of the Kızıl Irmak river on the site with a
mound now known as Ku¨ltepe. A Chalcolithic site in origin, it has a
history of continuous occupation down to the Roman period. But its
most flourishing phase occurred during the Early and Middle Bronze
Ages.”

And „The name of a king of Kanesh called Zipani figures in a well-known
tradition which deals with a rebellion of seventeen local rulers against
the Akkadian king Naram-Sin (c.2254–2218),”

Your confused interpretation of texts is quite irrelevant.
May 11, 2017 at 6:35 AM

Folker said…
@Rob You do realize that your answers relie on pure hypothesis? And as I said, that Hittites adopted a large part of Hattians culture, so why should they destroy everything? Earlier settlements were not destroyed, so what? Is there a clear connection to Hittites? No? So it proves nothing.

By the way, you are answering to facts (Hattic language, texts of different origins) with mere suppositions. There is simply no proof of presence of IE in Anatolia in the IIId millennium. Deal with it, or find something solid. Saying simply that there is a consensus about something leads nowhere. There was a consensus about Cultural diffusion and Paleolithic continuity some years ago. What happened?

An early divergence of Anatolian languages is likely, but it doesn’t need to have happened in Anatolia. It’s only because Anatolian languages are found in Anatolia around 1300BC that seems logical. But it’s purely conjectural.
May 11, 2017 at 7:45 AM

Folker said…
@Postneo, @Alogo Completely agree. I want to be clear about my position: I am not saying that no IE population existed in Anatolia in the IIId century, or that the split didn’t happen there. But, given that the story of this specific branch is quite different from the other ones, we need to keep our mind open on all possibilities.

By the way, there are some facts:
– Anatolia was not fully Indo Europeanized even in the late IId millenium BC, and some non-IE were prominant in the early IId millenium BC,
– No Steppe admixture has been found in Chalcolithic or EBA Anatolia,
– So far, all IE population tested did have some level of Steppe Admixture,
– an introgression from the East (CHG + Levant_N) seem clear in the IIId millenium BC,
– the IE languages in Anatolian are only attested after a. 2000 BC.

So, from that, the rest is purely conjectural. The only way to find out if the Anatolian branch came from the Steppe is to find samples in a clear IE context. The problem is, Hittites burned their dead, and DNA doesn’t resist fire. So, I think that we must put everything on the table, and test every hypothesis. That’s all.
May 11, 2017 at 9:01 AM

Ric Hern said…
Apparently Yuri Rassamakin suggested that Sredny Stog should be seen as four different Cultures within that area. (R1a, R1b, I2a and later G2a ?) Could this at least partly explain the Uralic, and Kartvelian connection with Indo-European ?
May 11, 2017 at 10:22 PM

Rob said…
I wonder what this all means for R1a..
I2 and R1b seem to have long been existing in a line from the Baltic to the Balkans since the LUP, to-ing and fro-ing through the epochs.
R1a appears in Karelia Mesolithic, then Ukraine „Neolithic”. It is also in a couple of the Meso-Neolithic samples from around Baikal…
Perhaps an Aral-Caspian centre of dispersion?
May 11, 2017 at 11:15 PM

Ric Hern said…
@Rob What about that Mesolithic R1a at Vasil’evka ? Isn’t that older than the Karelia sample ?
May 11, 2017 at 11:49 PM

Ric Hern said…
@Rob Yes and those same tribal types hung around there for at least 3000 years when you compare Vasil’evka and later Derievka.
May 12, 2017 at 12:58 AM

Onur Dinçer said…
From a purely historical perspective, Hattusa was conquered by Hittites even later than Nesa (Kanesh). When Hittites moved their capital from Nesa to Hattusa sometime during the 16th century BC the Hattusa region was still largely Hattic-speaking as evidenced from the abundance of Hattian names and the preservation of Hattian writings from that region in the Hittite records and the ongoing conquest of that region by Hittites even after the city of Hattusa became their capital. Even the name of the city of Hattusa comes from Hattians, natives of the Hattusa region, who were clearly a non-IE-speaking people. Hittites always preserved the memory of coming from Kussara and conquering Nesa and Hattusa later, they did not regard themselves as natives of Nesa or Hattusa.
May 12, 2017 at 9:34 AM

Ric Hern said…
We see with the Bell Beakers that Steppe R1b people were good adoptors and adaptors. (Maybe even Hittites ?) So wouldn’t this make añ earlier R1b migration from the Steppe a bit more difficult to trace Culturally if they soaked up Cultural elements from other Cultures like a sponge ?
May 14, 2017 at 1:26 AM

Ric Hern said…
What is Western Yamnaya ? Isn’t Western Yamnaya basically the earlier Sredny Stog ? Or were Sredny Stog basically totally displaced by Yamnaya ? If this was the case then where did those people go ?
Sredny Stog in their later phases show some elements similar to Later Corded Ware but what about the earlier phases and its probable connection to the people that lived in that area from +-8000 BCE. ? Sredny Stog came to an end at +-3500 bC. The Corded Ware Culture only emerged much later. So is Corded Ware descendants from Sredny Stog, Khvalynsk or Yamnaya ?
May 14, 2017 at 1:52 AM

Reklamy

4 uwagi do wpisu “51 The genomic history of Southeastern Europe (Mathieson et al. 2017 preprint), czyli północna droga R1a rządzi!!! :-)

  1. I znów to samo, czyli brak R1a na Bałkanach…

    http://eurogenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/05/a-few-more-ancient-genomes-from-balkans.html

    Thursday, May 25, 2017

    A few more ancient genomes from the Balkans and Iberia

    Open access at Current Biology:

    Our results show major Western hunter-gatherer (WHG) ancestry in a Romanian Eneolithic sample [GB1_Eneo] with a minor, but sizeable, contribution from Anatolian farmers, suggesting multiple admixture events between hunter-gatherers and farmers.

    González-Fortes et al., Paleogenomic Evidence for Multi-generational Mixing between Neolithic Farmers and Mesolithic Hunter-Gatherers in the Lower Danube Basin, Current Biology, Published Online: May 25, 2017, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2017.05.023

    See also…

    The genomic history of Southeastern Europe (Mathieson et al. 2017 preprint)

    Posted by Davidski at 1:21:00 PM

    Chad Rohlfsen said…
    R1b1 didn’t come from Italy. Anyone that knows anything about archaeology knows that. There is zero evidence of a big expansion out of Italy. R1b1 likely arose in the Moldova -Ukraine area 24-21 kya. It’s the appearance of shoulder-backed and microgravette pieces together before they become more separated with Epigravettians and northern deer hunters. Mark my words.
    May 25, 2017 at 4:38 PM

    Chad Rohlfsen said…
    Italy was repopulated by hunters from SE Europe. Not the other way around. Repeating something one hundred times won’t make it any more true than the first time it’s uttered.
    May 25, 2017 at 4:44 PM

    bellbeakerblogger said…
    Seems a little odd that this population and Samara/Yamnaya can be characterized almost as a two way hybrid between a male HG population and a southerly feminine farmer population of sorts. At least from these Y-chromosomes it seems a fraternity, here 100%. It raises a question to how this process played out in more than one place, but roughly the same time. I assume these guys lack ANE??
    May 25, 2017 at 9:12 PM

    Davidski said…
    @BBB At least from these Y-chromosomes it seems a fraternity, here 100%. It raises a question to how this process played out in more than one place, but roughly the same time. Seems like there was a somewhat different process in the Balkans than on the steppe. In the Balkans the Mesolithic Y-hg R disappeared during the Neolithic and was replaced by farmer G2. The minimal Mesolithic European admix in the farmers came from females carrying mtDNA U. However, from the Middle Neolithic onwards, Mesolithic-derived I2a from somewhere, probably from along the Danube, came into the Balkan farmer gene pool and largely replaced the G2. I’d say that the father of GB1_Eneo probably belonged to I2a, but it’s obviously impossible to be sure. On the steppe the Y-hgs were always Mesolithic European, so the admixture appears to have come in with women mostly with Near Eastern mtDNA hgs from the Caucasus and Balkans.
    May 25, 2017 at 9:23 PM

    Nirjhar007 said…
    Late Bronze Age Steppe where Indo-Aryan languages are from. B.U.L.L.S.H.I.T
    May 25, 2017 at 9:27 PM

    …..

    Ten ostatni to bidny i wkurwiony hindutva, co mu grunt spod nóg usuwa się…

    Polubienie

  2. No proszę!!! I znów ciekawostki z Bałkanów, ale znów nic nie potwierdza „południowej drogi R1a”…

    Sunday, May 21, 2017

    Steppe invaders in the Bronze Age Balkans

    In a recent blog post announcing the end of the search for the Late Proto-Indo-European (PIE) homeland I wrote this:

    But of course I2a has also been recorded in prehistoric samples from the Pontic-Caspian steppe. So, you might ask, why did the populations migrating out of the steppe belong to R1a and R1b, and why did some of them seemingly carry only R1a while others only R1b? This can be explained by local founder effects on the steppe due to patrilocality. Moreover, it’s possible that some groups moving out of the steppe did carry high frequencies of I2a, but they’re yet to enter the ancient DNA record.

    Actually, in hindsight, such a population has probably already shown up in the ancient DNA record, via two Early Bronze Age (EBA) individuals from the Balkans in the Mathieson et al. 2017 preprint:

    Balkans_BronzeAge I2165: Y-hg I2a2a1b1b mt-hg T2f 3020-2895 calBCE

    Yamnaya_Bulgaria Bul4: Y-hg I2a2a1b1b mt-hg ? 3012-2900 calBCE

    Both samples are from burial sites in present-day South-Central Bulgaria. Apart from sharing I2a2a1b1b, they each pack a fair bit of Yamnaya-related ancestry and are dated to a very similar time period. Unlike Bul4, I2165 does not make the cut archaeologically as a Yamnaya sample, but he does come from a Tumulus (Kurgan-like) burial, so perhaps he’s from a group influenced by Yamnaya?

    By the way, the I2a2a1b1b lineage is also shared by Yamnaya_Kalmykia RISE552, and as far as I can tell, the oldest individual sampled to date belonging to this line is Ukraine_Neolithic I1738, dated to 5473-5326 calBCE. So I2a2a1b1b appears to be a Pontic-Caspian steppe marker.

    The same paper also includes the following individual from present-day Bulgaria dated to the start of the Late Bronze Age (LBA), which is roughly when the Mycenaeans appeared nearby in what is now Greece:

    Bulgaria_MLBA I2163: Y-hg R1a1a1b2 mt-hg U5a2 1750-1625 calBCE

    This guy is the most Yamnaya-like of all of the Balkan samples in Mathieson et al. 2017, and, as far as I can see based on his overall genome-wide results, probably indistinguishable from the contemporaneous Srubnaya people of the Pontic-Caspian steppe. He also belongs to Y-haplogroup R1a-Z93, which is a marker typical of Srubnaya and other closely related steppe groups such as Andronovo, Potapovka and Sintashta. So there’s very little doubt that he’s either a migrant or a recent descendant of migrants to the Balkans from the Pontic-Caspian steppe.

    The presence of multiple individuals like this in the still rather spotty Balkan Bronze Age ancient DNA record suggests that this part of Europe experienced sustained and possibly at times large scale incursions of various peoples from the Pontic-Caspian steppe throughout the Bronze Age.

    Here’s one of the Principal Component Analyses (PCA) from Mathieson et al. 2017, edited by me to highlight the above mentioned three samples, as well as the anything but weak impact of gene flow from the Pontic-Casian steppe on the Balkans during the Bronze Age. Just in case some of you are confused, I added an arrow pointing to the cluster that most of the Balkan Bronze Age samples are pulling towards.

    Of course, many of us are now eagerly awaiting a paper on the genetic origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans. The latter are one of the few attested Indo-European speakers from prehistory, so their genetic structure may prove pivotal in the Indo-European homeland debate.

    I know for a fact that a couple of ancient DNA labs have been working on such a paper for a while now, but I haven’t heard anything about the results. However, just looking at the PCA above, I’d be shocked if the Mycenaean samples did not show a strong signal of gene flow from the Pontic-Caspian steppe. If so, the implications of this will be obvious.

    Reference…

    Mathieson et al., The Genomic History Of Southeastern Europe, bioRxiv, Posted May 9, 2017, doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/135616

    Posted by Davidski at 4:43:00 AM 276 comments:

    Polubienie

    • Davidski said…
      It can, but considering the presence of I2a on the Pontic-Caspian steppe, we should expect it in Yamnaya and Yamnaya-like individuals who look like they’ve migrated out of the steppe. And so far we have two from the same place in Bulgaria. There will probably be a lot more from the Balkans.
      May 21, 2017 at 5:24 AM

      Coldmountains said…
      Is it possible to say which prehistoric origin Slavic I2a-din has? Yamnaya? Globular Amphora?…
      May 21, 2017 at 5:46 AM

      Davidski said…
      Bulgaria_MLBA I2163 is full like CWC.
      More similar to Srubnaya IMO, plus it has the R1a-Z93 that CWC doesn’t.
      May 21, 2017 at 7:34 AM

      Dmytro said…
      „Is it possible to say which prehistoric origin Slavic I2a-din has? Yamnaya? Globular Amphora?…”
      There is no aDNA evidence (yet) for the I2a line which led to the Slavic I2a. The closest (if very distant) relative so far documented is the Esperstedt Funnel Beaker L-161… The GAC I2a’s and the steppe origin I2a’s are all from a very distinct I2a line which has nothing to do with I2a-din (as you know). So we still wait. The Motala 12 HG (ca. mid-6th mill. BCE) does have L-147, but that is almost certainly a defunct M423 line, and does not lead to CTS10228. The best we can do for now is to assume that I2a-din in 3000BCE was hiding somewhere in Northern or Northwestern Europe…
      May 21, 2017 at 7:37 AM

      Ir Pegasus said…
      Srubnaya and I2163 like CWC, but not Yamnaya. The Srubnaya culture was after I2163 so I2163 from synchronous to Sintashta-Potapovka culture.
      May 21, 2017 at 7:57 AM

      Davidski said…
      @Rob All the Copper Age / pre Yamnaya I2a2 to date is from Central Europe & the Balkans. So it instead looks like movement east. As per the PCA, the movement was from the east during the Yamnaya expansion. There’s no mistaking that. Also, there’s I2a2a1b1 in Neolithic Ukraine at Dereivka and Volniensky, so Yamnaya got its I2a2a1b1b from the Neolithic Pontic Steppe.

      @Romulus More realistically I2a farmers brought PIE to the Steppe.
      You must realize at some level that this is total bullshit.
      May 21, 2017 at 2:39 PM

      Davidski said…
      @Rob Yes there’s Neolithic I2a2 in Ukraine, but none in the copper age steppe. Ulan IV from Kalmykia belongs to I2a2. Are you suggesting that he got this from the Balkans rather than a site much further east like, say, Dereivka? You’re free to suggest this, but obviously your argument would be very weak.
      May 21, 2017 at 3:01 PM

      Blogger Davidski said…
      Heh, in fact Ulan IV belongs to I2a2a1b1b2.
      May 21, 2017 at 3:03 PM

      Apóstolos Papaðimitríu said…
      | More realistically I2a farmers brought PIE to the Steppe.
      Yeah. It seems Indoeuropean farmers liked exotic women, see for example ANI163, Varna_Outlier.
      May 21, 2017 at 3:41 PM

      Blogger Davidski said…
      @Apóstolos Papaðimitríu Indoeuropean farmers
      That’s hilarious. How about the Y-hg R1 and steppe admixture in Varna ANI153? Also brought by exotic women? Be careful now when you answer the question genius; women don’t carry Y-chromosomes.
      May 21, 2017 at 3:47 PM

      Davidski said…
      @Apóstolos Papaðimitríu How much Steppe does Varna ANI153 have (male, R1:M306)?

      Compare it to ANI163 (a woman). Makes no difference in such a small sample set. The overall evidence suggests that both men and women moved from the steppe into the Copper Age Balkans.
      You’re obviously not interested in what really happened. Like many people posting here you’re more interested in pushing a version of events that you’re more comfortable with.

      The idea that Neolithic farmers spoke Proto-Indo-European makes no sense on linguistic grounds and also goes against the overall ancient DNA picture. You should be more honest with yourself. It’s not like you’re going to convince any reasonable person here that you’re making sense. Why even bother?
      May 21, 2017 at 4:49 PM

      Davidski said…
      @Rob It could certainly be another layer of contact. There’s no reason to assume that the PIEs ‚divorced’ irrevocably once they separated c. 3000 BC, or whichever date one favours. The Steppe_MLBA Z93 link might just be a layer of contact between far flung Indo-Europeans, or it may represent the arrival of the Mycenaean dynasty. But if there are more than a handful of Mycenaean samples in this new paper, then comparing them to earlier mainland groups from Greece and to Minoans might reveal some very interesting things.
      May 22, 2017 at 1:24 AM

      Ric Hern said…
      My uneducated guess is that Afontova Gora 3 like individuals roamed the Steppe from the Romania to Southern Siberia between 20 000 and 14 000 years ago.
      May 23, 2017 at 1:50 AM

      Davidski said…
      @Arch Hades Why would the Myceneans not just cluster with the majority of the Bronze age Balkan samples instead of that 1 R1a1a outlier from Bulgaria?

      Who claimed that? I didn’t. What I said was that the Z93 sample (not really an outlier, because he forms a very neat cline along with Balkan Yamnaya, Vucedol and most other Balkan BA samples) might represent the arrival of the horse/chariot complex in the southern Balkans, and related admixture in Mycenaeans.

      I have no idea how much of this admixture will be in the sampled Mycenaean groups. We might find one Sintashta clone in one of the grave shafts that has Sintashta horse bits as grave goods, or we might not. The Sintashta-related admixture might be more evenly spread out in the Mycenaean elite, or even across their whole society.

      My thoughts at the moment are that the proto-Mycenaeans arrived in the Balkans with Yamnaya, and I think it’s pretty clear from the PCA above that if not for the really spotty sampling of the EBA Balkans in this paper, we’d see a massive surge of Yamnaya ancestry into the Balkans during the EBA.

      I think that the horse/chariot complex had a profound impact on Mycenaean culture, but that it was a secondary layer of steppe influence in the Mycenaeans.
      May 23, 2017 at 6:47 PM

      Davidski said…
      „Yamnaya” ancestry existed in the east Balkans 1500 years before Yamnaya.
      It didn’t. You’re confusing Khvalynsk-like ancestry with Yamnaya ancestry. The Khvalynsk type of ancestry isn’t part of the BA Balkan-Yamnaya cline.
      May 23, 2017 at 6:58 PM

      EastPole said…
      @Nirjhar007 “So David thinks Z-93 will be there in Mycenaean”

      We have to look into Altaic borrowings from IE to determine the original language of Z-93 like this one:

      We know that Tocharians had contacts with Slavs, maybe Altaics as well. Sintashta and Andronovo are autosomaly close to Eastern Slavs. Indo-Iranians are autosomaly more related to Yamnaya according to recent publications.
      May 23, 2017 at 11:20 PM

      Davidski said…
      For example in Yamnaya Kalmykia, more than half is U5 and U4, i.e. 4xU5 + 1xU4 versus 1 x J2b + 2 x T2a1 + 1xT2c1. Moreover, T2a1a in Yamnaya Kalmykia can be of European origin. One of the Khvalynsk samples belongs to Y-hg Q and mtDNA U4 and has over 40% CHG, so why can’t some of the U4 and U5 in Yamnaya be associated with CHG admixture into mostly EHG males?
      May 24, 2017 at 2:01 AM

      EastPole said…
      @Gioiello “Why does people think that Albanian language came from Eastern Europe and not that Slavs, i.e. Samara, came from the Balkans?

      Alb mish „flesh, meat” < EPA memsa < IEmemso- id. (Skr. mamsa „flesh, meat” , Arm mis, Goth mimz, Slav *meso)”

      Your ignorance is probably the result of poor quality pseudo-scientific books you have been reading.

      http://ukdataexplorer.com/european-translator/?word=meat

      Polish ‘mięso’(mienso) > Sanskryt ‘māṁsa’
      Because Sk. ‘ā’< Sl. ‘ie-/ia-’, i.e. long vowels in IE come from diphthongs involving ‘–i-‘ or ‘-u-‘ present in Slavic:

      ‘m’ and ‘n’ are interchangeable

      or Sl. ‘ve-‘ >Sk. ‘ū’
      look at Polish ‘wełna’ (velna) > Sk. ‘ūrṇā’
      , Sl. ’l’>Sk. ’r’.

      http://ukdataexplorer.com/european-translator/?word=wool

      Albanian, Gothic words are borrowings from Slavic, Armenian probably from Indo-Iranian.

      @Arza
      Balkans Chalcolithic and Varna with both outliers:

      We need more Late Sredny Stog Dereivka samples to find out what it means:


      May 24, 2017 at 7:23 AM

      Gioiello said…
      @ EastPole „Your ignorance is probably the result of poor quality pseudo-scientific books you have been reading”.

      Goth mimz
      Lith mesa
      OCS meso
      Alb mish
      Arm mis
      Skt mas /masa-
      Toch B misa
      Lat membrum (dick)
      Grk menigks
      OIr mir
      Rus mjazdrà

      Davidski, have I to laugh? Everything from Polish?
      May 24, 2017 at 10:58 AM

      EastPole said…
      @Gioiello “Davidski, have I to laugh? Everything from Polish?”

      Western Slavic languages like Polish are more archaic and conservative than Southern Slavic like OCS or Eastern Slavic like Russian, not to mention Albanian, Latin or Germanic. Comparing Slavic languages with Vedic Sanskrit, Avestan, Homeric Greek, Gothic and others which were influenced by CWC migrations into Asia, Balkans, Scandinavia etc. we can reconstruct many CWC words. So as explained in the examples given above Polish ‘mięso’(mienso) was probably how CWC people pronounced “meat” and Polish ‚velna’ was how they pronounce ‚wool’. Notice that CWC originated and expanded from Poland, was R1a dominated, produced populations autosomaly close to Slavs like Sintashta or Andronovo, maybe this is the reason.
      May 24, 2017 at 11:31 AM

      Gioiello said…
      @ EastPole All what you said is wrong just from a linguistic point of view. Two phenomena (palatalization and polnoglasie: the last „The change has been dated to the second half of the eighth century, before any Slavic languages were recorded in writing”) explain why what you said is false and with any knowledge of linguistics: ask who teaches at Goettingen. Latin membrum demonstrates that a word *mems-ro- was in old Latin, and the vocal is -e-: no palatalization. The problem of the slides y/w is other thing, which has nothing to do with what you said.
      May 24, 2017 at 1:24 PM

      Gioiello said…
      @ EastPole And that -m- in mems-ro- weren’t interchangeable with -n- is demonstrated from Latin menstruum > *mens-ro- with the different outcomes: *msro- >mbro and *nsro->nstro-.
      May 24, 2017 at 5:35 PM

      Blogger Gioiello said…
      If we take Latin monstrum certainly from moneo, we may hypothesize three different roots: *mem-, *men-, *mon-. To explain the link with moon, meter, meat etc, and why not Latin mentula etc
      May 24, 2017 at 5:51 PM

      EastPole said…
      @Alogo “stop confusing language with genetics and assuming cognates have Slavic roots, man”

      There is a correlation between genes and languages. It is a proven fact. R1a-Z93 correlates with Indo-Iranian languages. R1a-Z283 correlates with Balto-Slavic languages. If some Indo-Iranian words, as I have shown, can be derived from Slavic words, then R1a- Z645 probably used similar words and they were close to Slavic. Because there are plenty of such words, we can conclude that CWC population in Poland was using language closer to Slavic than to Indo-Iranian.
      May 24, 2017 at 11:13 PM

      Polubienie

  3. Jeśli ktoś myśli, że odpuściłem łowcom ruskich trolli i innym podobnym ich brednie o „południowej drodze R1a”, no to pomyłka! Tymczasem gińcie ze strachu kluseczki, bo wkrótce powracam do kopania zwolenników „południowej drogi R1a”, leżących i krwawiących ze wszystkich otworów, także i tych dokonanych moim dowodzeniem… 🙂

    A oto poniżej wpis, który już jest tylko kolejnym dobijaniem konającego Hindusa z hindutva, no ale można w komentarzach do niego znaleźć przykłady na myślenie podobne do mojego, o pochodzeniu tzw. PIE = Pra+Słowian od łowców mamutów ze stepu, jak ci z Mezine… z bagien Prypeci…

    History of the Swastika – Mezine Old Europe Vinca Cucuteni Trypillian Greece Rome Celtic Germanic

    Published on May 3, 2015
    The earliest swastika ever found was uncovered in Mezine, Ukraine. It is carved on late paleolithic figurine of mammoth ivory, being dated as early as about 10,000 BC. Among the earliest cultures utilizing swastika is the Old Europe, neolithic Danube Valley Civilization, Vinca, Cucuteni-Trypillian

    In Bronze Age Europe, the „Sun cross” appears most frequently of all continents, often interpreted as a solar symbol. Swastika shapes have been found on numerous artifacts from Iron Age Europe (Greco-Roman, Illyrian, Etruscan, Baltic, Celtic, Germanic, Slavic and Georgian Borjgali).This prehistoric use seems to be reflected in the appearance of the symbol in various folk cultures of Europe. The symbol has been found on vessels in the ancient city of Troy, The evidence shows that it served as a symbol of fertility and life. Its similar use can be found in Trench Graves in Mycanae, Greece, on Athenian vases and even decorating the garments of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. Also the Greek Parthenon had this symbol as a Greek design just like other designs.

    Swastika is a definite European sign moving east into Indus Valley Civilization. It was brought by migrating tribes to India where it is revered in the religious and cultural life of the Indo-Aryans. It did not originate in the Indus Valley Civilization as some people thought.

    Distribution of mobile art in Eastern Europe.

    1 Staryé Duruitory, 2 Brynzeny, 3 Kosseoutzy, 4 Klimaoutzy, 5 Suren’ 1, 6 Chan-Koba, 7 Apiantcha, 8 grotte d’Uvarov, 9 Sakagia, 10 Sagvardgilé, 11 Gvardgilas-Kldé, 12 Devis-Khvreli, 13 Taro-Kldé, 14 Molodova V, 15 Lissitchniki, 16 Lipa VI, 17 Klinetz, 18 Ossokorovka, 19 Dubovaya Balka, 20 Kaïstrovaya Balka, 21 Mejiritch (Mezhirich), 22 Kievo-Kirillovskaya, 23 Mézine (Mezin), 24 Novgorod Severskyi, 25 Puchkari I, 26 Dobranitchevka, 27 Gontzy, 28, Rogalik, 29 Amvrossievka, 30 Eliseevitchi I, 31 Eliseevitchi II, 32 Yudinovo, 33 Khoylevo II, 34 Timonovka, 35 Suponevo, 36 Avdeevo, 37 Sungir’, 38 Gagarino, 39 Kostienki 19, 40 Kostienki 21, 41 Kostienki 13, 42 Kostienki 1, 43 Kostienki 14, 44 Kostienki 12, 45 Kostienki 17, 46 Kostienki 2, 47 Kostienki 11, 48 Kostienki 4, 49 Kostienki 15, 50 Kostienki 9, 51 Kostienki 8, 52 Borchtchevo 1, 53 Borchtchevo 2, 54 Ilskaya, 55 Murakovka, 56 Ostrovskaya, 57 Bez’imyannyi, 58 Smelobskaya, 59 Kapova, 60 Ignatievskaya.
    Photo: Abramova (1995)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mezine

    Mezine is a place within the modern country of Ukraine which has the most artifact finds of Paleolithic culture origin.[1][2][3][4] The epigravettian [5] site is located on a bank of the Desna river.[6] The settlement is best known for an archaeological find of a set of bracelets engraved with marks possibly representing calendar lunar-cycles.[7] Also found near Mezine was the earliest known example of a swastika-like form, as part of a decorative object dated to 10,000 BCE. It was described (see references for illustrations) as an object carved from ivory mammoth tusks to resemble [8] an:

    The bird is understood as an inherently shamanistic animal, often being a symbol of the soul or of the spirit experienced in flight (from death).[10] (…)

    http://eurogenes.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/out-of-india-chickens-coming-home-to.html

    Tuesday, July 4, 2017

    Out-of-India chickens coming home to roost

    Razib has posted a spacious but none-too-technical review of the ongoing Aryan Invasion Theory (AIT) controversy, along with some personal anecdotes and predictions about how ancient DNA from South Asia might shape the debate in the near future (see here).

    It should be a useful guide to the topic for those of you who aren’t quite as excited about reading about my latest adventures with qpGraph as many of the regulars in the comments here.

    One thing that I’d perhaps add to Razib’s post is that the ancient DNA record now boasts Late Neolithic Yamnaya-like Corded Ware Culture individuals from the East Baltic region that belong to Y-haplogroup R1a-Z645. And that’s usually as far as their lineages go (see here).

    This is important, because the Z645 mutation is directly and recently ancestral to the pair of likely post-Neolithic mutations that define the two R1a subclades most common in Europe and South Asia today: Z282 and Z93, respectively.

    So not only are the „European” R1a-Z282 and „South Asian” R1a-Z93 relatively young sister clades, but their ancestral clade has now been found in ancient samples from Northeastern Europe that probably predate their appearance by only a few generations, if that. Of course, the upshot of all of this is that R1a-Z93 could not have originated very far from the East Baltic, which makes South Asia look about as likely as the homeland of this subclade as the goddamn moon. Conversely, it makes AIT look very plausible indeed.

    However, granted, this might seem very confusing to anyone who hasn’t been studying the R1a topology for years, and perhaps better left out of the more mainstream debates on AIT for the sake of simplicity. By the way, I found this part of Razib’s post especially intriguing:

    One scientist who holds to the position that most South Asian ancestry dates to the Pleistocene argued to me that we don’t know if ancient Indian samples from the northwest won’t share even more ancestry than the Iranian Neolithic and Pontic steppe samples. In other words, ANI was part of some genetic continuum that extended to the west and north. This is possible, but I do not find it plausible.

    I suspect that this scientist’s rather fanciful suggestion (which really flies in the face of very solid models based on ancient genomic data from Europe and surrounds) is a hint of the direction that the debate will take right after the publication of ancient genomes from South Asia. Because when that happens, obfuscators like this guy (usually hopeless Out-of-India proponents) will either have to concede defeat and quit the debate, or ramp up their obfuscations to spectacular new highs.

    And please don’t mistake my confidence on this issue for bluff and bluster. It’s not exactly the best kept secret out there that ancient samples from India and Pakistan are now ready, and…oops I probably can’t say more than that for now. Pity.

    See also…

    Ancient herders from the Pontic-Caspian steppe crashed into India: no ifs or buts

    Posted by Davidski at 8:39:00 PM 132 comments:

    …..

    batman said…
    Davidski, „And metallurgy is not a Proto-Indo-European thing. It was introduced into Indo-European societies by foreigners.”

    There’s ample indications of a relationship between the origin of the (pre-neolithic) ceramcis of northern Eurasia and the metalurgy of northern Eurasia.

    Furthermore, the later evolution of pottery and metallurgy – both – have obvious relations with the spread anevolution of agriculture.

    Finally we may see that the evolution of all three fields of competence and capabilities are related to the mesolithic routes of travel and trade – basically following the waterways along coasts and major rivers.

    During the last two decades there’s been several discoveries of major networks – of civil travel and organized trade – across most of Europe and northern Asia already during late-mesolithic Europe. That includes the Atlantic facade and the Mediterranean waters in the west, as well as the Baltic, the Black and the Caspian Seas in central Eurasia. The latter connected via the first, organized river-trade, no later than 8.000 BP.

    As the traces of a „basal Eurasian” trading-culture goes back to the mesolithic time, there’s no more room for a „unknown, nostratic origin” of the I-E expressions, as recognized in languages, forms and formats, symbols and structures.

    Today we may even link the forms and formats of late-Paleolithic symbolism and the well-known world of the Corded, Combed and Pit-Wares. Today we may even follow a tradition of decorative symbolism from the very late-Paleolithic Mezin – via the pottery of the North Eurasia’s Neolithic, as well as the art of Eurasia’s Bronze Age and Iron Age…

    http://donsmaps.com/wolfcamp.html

    Per consequence there’s no factual reasons left to claim that metalurgy – as little as pottery and agriculture – was explored and developed into (common) craftmanship – in isolation from the Indo-European culture. Unless you’re in need to claim that the cultural expressions of the first I-E speakers originated south of the 40th paralell…

    July 7, 2017 at 6:24 AM

    Vara said…
    @Davidski „And metallurgy is not a Proto-Indo-European thing. It was introduced into Indo-European societies by foreigners.”

    How did you reach this conclusion? Proto-Indo-Europeans held metal work in high regards, and all of the known IE people had a smith god or a smith hero, Hittites included.

    July 7, 2017 at 10:41 AM

    Davidski said…
    @Vara Proto-Indo-European has very limited vocab related to metallurgy. This doesn’t look good for the idea that is commonly argued in the comments here that the Proto-Indo-European culture was spread on the back of metallurgy.

    More on the topic of metal and Indo-Europeans at the Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture.

    https://books.google.com.au/books?id=tzU3RIV2BWIC&pg=PA379&lpg=PA379&dq=Encyclopedia+of+Indo-European+Culture+metal&source=bl&ots=wWs5-64bdH&sig=1H0DMRytFFEp6_lPu_bLK0AxEZE&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjynqrbrPjUAhUEI5QKHfG2AukQ6AEIKjAB&authuser=1#v=onepage&q=Encyclopedia%20of%20Indo-European%20Culture%20metal&f=false

    July 7, 2017 at 4:52 PM

    Polubienie

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