75 Fuck / Fa/o”K,.. czyli skończmy w końcu z tym ofitzjalnym etymologiczeskim pieprzeniem,.. czyli no to jak to było pierwotnie w Pra-Słowiańskim? :-)

Origin Of The Word „FUCK”

CHRISAKABR1082
Published on Oct 9, 2009

The origin of the word „fuck”, its meanings and multiple ways to use it in a sentence.


Puk, puk,.. jest tam kto?

Pisało o tym wiele i wielu, ale jeszcze więcej jak to zwykle tylko „pieprzyło bez sensu”.  Teraz więc niniejszym ja pokażę wszystkim jak bardzo bez sensu to było. Posłuchajta, a właściwie poczytajta wszyscy, ale szczególnie i zwłaszcza ofizjalni jęsykoznaftzy i inni allo-allo, jak tam z tym angielskim pieprzonym pieprzeniem było…

Tak więc, ucune przeciw-logiczne i przeciw-słowiańskie mondrale, które do tej pory nie umieliśta i nadal nie umieta wywieść znaczenia nawet tak prostego i podstawowego słowa… Oto napiszę wam wszystkim, to co napisane być powinno, a co Gerald powiedział demonowi, który ukrywał się chyba w jakiejś flaszce, czy innym dzbanie…

Eee… no tak, ale to to już sobie musita same przeczytać, bo nie mogę tego po krasnoludzku napisać…

Zaraz, zaraz… A może to było po elfiemu, bo po krasnoludzku to wiedźmin miał chyba na mieczu „nie na potwory” wyryte… „Na pohybel skurwysynom”,.. oczywiście w wolnym tłumaczeniu… 🙂

http://www.andrzejsapkowski.pl/sostatnie.html

Tu trochę wiadomości ogólnych, a dalej przejdę do wywiedzenia źródłosłowu i prawdziwego i pierwotnego znaczenia tego tradycyjnie już bardzo zniekształconego germańskiego słowa… Fuck / Fa/o”K.

Zara, zara… No a co wszyscy z tego mojego pukania do Waszych umysłów macie zapamiętać?

Po pierwsze zapamiętajcie, że tzw. prawo Raska / Grimma wskazuje, że słowiańskie słowo Pukać / Po”K+aC’/T’,  jest IDENTYCZNE Z ODTWORZONYM RZEKOMYM  *pug– , co oznacza, że słowiańskie słowo JEST STARSZE od później zniekształconego germańskiego jakkolwiek zwał Fucka / Fukka / Fo”K+Ka, itp, patrz:

P>F

Po drugie zapamiętajcie, że w ofitzjalnych etymologiczeskich fyfodach jakoś tak przedziwnie, nigdzie powyższych i poniższych wiadomości nie znajdziecie… Dzifne no nie? 😉

No to co, popukajmy teraz trochę w allo-allo i ofitzjalne jęsykosnafztfo i wszystkich innych tych, czy tamtych nazistów, ich przodków i potomków i ich przeciw-logicznych i ich przeciw-słowiańskie kłamstwa. Niech oni i ich fietza pękną razem, jak napuchnięte rybie pęcherze pławne, co to po nich jako dziecięciem będąc skakałem…  🙂

Z/S+L”aWa NaS”+yM PRa+STaR+yM Z/S+L”oW+iaN’+SKiM Z/S+L”oW+oM


https://solongasitswords.wordpress.com/2014/02/12/on-the-origin-of-fuck/

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/melissa-mohr/a-fcking-short-history-of_b_3352948.html

https://www.snopes.com/language/acronyms/fuck.asp

…..

https://www.etymonline.com/word/fuck

(…) Written form attested from at least early 16c.; OED 2nd edition cites 1503, in the form fukkit, and the earliest attested appearance of current spelling is 1535 („Bischops … may fuck thair fill and be vnmaryit” [Sir David Lyndesay, „Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaits”]). Presumably it is a more ancient word, but one not written in the kind of texts that have survived from Old English and Middle English [September 2015: the verb appears to have been found recently in an English court manuscript from 1310]. Buck cites proper name John le Fucker from 1278, but that surname could have other explanations. The word apparently is hinted at in a scurrilous 15c. poem, titled „Flen flyys,” written in bastard Latin and Middle English. The relevant line reads:

Non sunt in celi
quia fuccant uuiuys of heli

„They [the monks] are not in heaven because they fuck the wives of [the town of] Ely.” Fuccant is pseudo-Latin, and in the original it is written in cipher. The earliest examples of the word otherwise are from Scottish, which suggests a Scandinavian origin, perhaps from a word akin to Norwegian dialectal fukka”copulate,” or Swedish dialectal focka  „copulate, strike, push,” and fock „penis.” Another theory traces the Modern English verb to Middle English fyke, fike „move restlessly, fidget” (see fike) which also meant „dally, flirt,” and probably is from a general North Sea Germanic word (compare Middle Dutch fokken, German ficken „fuck,” earlier „make quick movements to and fro, flick,” still earlier „itch, scratch;” the vulgar sense attested from 16c.). (…)

…..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

Fuck is an obscene English-language word,[1] which refers to the act of sexual intercourse and is also commonly used as an intensifier or to denote disdain. Its origin is obscure but is usually considered to be first attested to around 1475, although it may be considerably older. In modern usage, the term fuck and its derivatives (such as fucker and fucking) can be used as a noun, a verb, an adjective, an interjection, or an adverb. There are many common phrases that employ the word, as well as compounds that incorporate it, such as motherfucker, fuckwit and fucknut. (…)

Etymology

The Oxford English Dictionary states that the ultimate etymology is uncertain, but that the word is „probably cognate” with a number of Germanic words with meanings involving striking, rubbing, and having sex or is derivative of the Old French word that meant „to fuck”.[7]

First use in sexual sense

In 2015, Dr. Paul Booth claimed to have found „(possibly) the earliest known use of the word ‚fuck’ that clearly has a sexual connotation”: in English court records of 1310–11, a man local to Chester is referred to as „Roger Fuckebythenavele„, probably a nickname. „Either this refers to an inexperienced copulator, referring to someone trying to have sex with the navel, or it’s a rather extravagant explanation for a dimwit, someone so stupid they think this that is the way to have sex,” says Booth.[8] An earlier name, that of John le Fucker recorded in 1278, has been the subject of debate, but is thought by many philologists to have had some separate and non-sexual origin.

Otherwise, the usually accepted first known occurrence of the word is found in code in a poem in a mixture of Latin and English composed in the 15th century.[9] The poem, which satirizes the Carmelite friars of Cambridge, England, takes its title, „Flen flyys„, from the first words of its opening line, Flen, flyys, and freris („Fleas, flies, and friars”). The line that contains fuck reads Non sunt in coeli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmkDeciphering the phrase „gxddbou xxkxzt pg ifmk„, here by replacing each letter by the previous letter in alphabetical order, as the English alphabet was then, yields the macaronic non sunt in coeli, quia fuccant vvivys of heli, which translated means, „They are not in heaven, because they fuck the women of Ely„.[10] The phrase was probably encoded because it accused monks of breaking their vows of celibacy;[9] it is uncertain to what extent the word fuck was considered acceptable at the time. The stem of fuccant is an English word used as Latin: English medieval Latin has many examples of writers using English words when they did not know the Latin word: „workmannus” is an example. In the Middle English of this poem, the term wife was still used generically for „woman”.[citation needed]

Older etymology

Via Germanic

The word has probable cognates in other Germanic languages, such as German   ficken (to fuck); Dutch fokken (to breed, to beget); dialectal Norwegian  fukka (to copulate), and dialectal Swedish focka (to strike, to copulate) and fock (penis).[7]

This points to a possible etymology where Common Germanic fuk– comes from an Indo-European root meaning „to strike”, cognate with non-Germanic words such as Latin pugno „I fight” or pugnus „fist”.[7] By application of Grimm’s law, this hypothetical root has the form *pug–.

There is a theory that fuck is most likely derived from Flemish, German, or Dutch roots, and is probably not derived from an Old English root.[9]

Via Latin or Greek

There may be a kinship with the Latin futuere (futuo), a verb with almost exactly the same meaning as the English verb „to fuck”. From fūtuere  came French foutreCatalan fotre, Italian fottereRomanian futere, vulgar peninsular Spanish joderPortuguese foder, and the obscure English equivalent to futter, coined by Richard Francis Burton.

However, there is no clear past lineage or derivation for the Latin word. These roots, even if cognates, are not the original Indo-European word for to copulate, but Wayland Young argues that they derive from the Indo-European *bhu– or *bhug– („be”, „become”), or as causative „create” [see Young, 1964].

A possible intermediate might be a Latin 4th-declension verbal noun *fūtus, with possible meanings including „act of (pro)creating”.

However, the connection to futuere has been disputed‍—‌Anatoly Liberman calls it a „coincidence” and writes that it is not likely to have been borrowed from the Low German precursors to fuck.[11]

Greek phyō (φύω) has various meanings, including (of a man) „to beget”, or (of a woman), „to give birth to”.[12] Its perfect pephyka (πέφυκα) can be likened[citation needed] to „fuck” and its equivalents in other Germanic languages.[12]

False etymologies

One reason that the word fuck is so hard to trace etymologically is that it was used far more extensively in common speech than in easily traceable written forms. There are several urban-legend false etymologies postulating an acronymic origin for the word. None of these acronyms was ever recorded before the 1960s, according to the authoritative lexicographical work The F-Word, and thus are backronyms. In any event, the word fuck has been in use far too long for some of these supposed origins to be possible. Some of these urban legends are that the word fuck came from Irish law. If a couple were caught committing adultery, they would be punished „For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge In the Nude,” with „FUCKIN” written on the stocks above them to denote the crime. A similar variant on this theory involves the recording by church clerks of the crime of „Forbidden Use of Carnal Knowledge.” Another theory is that of a royal permission. During the Black Death in the Middle Ages, towns were trying to control populations and their interactions. Since uncontaminated resources were scarce, supposedly many towns required permission to have children. Hence, the legend goes, that couples that were having children were required to first obtain royal permission (usually from a local magistrate or lord) and then place a sign somewhere visible from the road in their home that said „Fornicating Under Consent of King,” which was later shortened to „FUCK.” This story is hard to document, but has persisted in oral and literary traditions for many years; however, it has been demonstrated to be an urban legend.[13]

A different false etymology, first made popular on the radio show Car Talk, states that the phrase „fuck you” comes from the phrase „pluck yew” and relates the origins of fuck to the myth surrounding the V sign. This myth states that French archers at the Battle of Agincourt insulted the English troops’ ability to shoot their weapons by waving their fingers in a V shape; after the English secured a landslide victory, they returned the gesture. The addition of the phrase „fuck you” to the myth came when it was claimed that the English yelled that they could still „pluck yew” (yew wood being the preferred material for longbows at the time), a phrase that evolved into the modern „fuck you”.[9]

Grammar

Fuck has a very flexible role in English grammar, including use as both a transitive and  intransitive verb,and as an adjectiveadverb, and noun.[14] It can also be used as an interjection  and a  grammatical ejaculation. Linguist Geoffrey Hughes found eight distinct usages for English curse words, and fuck can apply to each. For example, it fits in the „curse” sense („fuck you!”) as well as the „personal” sense („You fucker”). Its vulgarity also contributes to its mostly figurative sense, though the word itself is used in its literal sense to refer to sexual intercourse, its most common usage is figurative- to indicate the speaker’s strong sentiment and to offend or shock the listener.[15] (…)

…..

Tyle oficjalne jęsykoznafztfo, a teraz czas na coś logicznego, więc skrócimy cierpienia młodych niewyżytych Werterów…

Po pierwsze:

(…) derive from the Indo-European *bhu– or *bhug– („be”, „become”) (…)


UWAGA! Wiarygodność także i tego „odtworzenia” jest taka, jak wiarygodność odtworzonego tzw. PIE *weme-, czy innego  *wemh₁-, czyli Wy+MioT.. czyli ŻADNA, patrz:


https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/futuo#Latin

Latin

Etymology

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to hit). Related to fūstis.

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fustis#Latin

Latin

Etymology


UWAGA! Błędne odtworzenie, patrz: Żąć / Z”a”/oN+C’/T’, Żnij / Z”NiJ,.. nie zapominając o Żuć / Z”o”+C’/T’, Żuchwa / Z”o”+(c)HWa, Zyć / Z”y+C’/T’, Życie / Z”y+C/Tie, itp!


http://sjp.pwn.pl/slowniki/%C5%BCnij.html

żnij

Wielki słownik ortograficzny

żąć (zboże) żnę, żniesz, żną; żnij•cie; żął, żęła, żęli; żęty
żęcie (zboża)

Słownik języka polskiego

żąć «ścinać zboże lub trawę»

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%CF%86%CF%8D%CF%89

φύω

Ancient Greek

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to appear, become, rise up). Cognates include Old Armenian բոյս (boysplant)Sanskrit भवति (bhavati)Avestan (bu)Latin fuī (I was)Old English bēon (English be), and Albanian bëj.

Pronunciation

Verb

φῠ́ω  (phúō)

  1. (transitive) To bring forthproducegenerate, cause to grow
  2. (transitive) To begetbear, give birth to
  3. (intransitive) To growarisespring up
  4. (intransitive, present tense) to become [+adjective]
  5. (intransitive, aorist and perfect)
  6. (copulative) To be by nature [+adjective]
  7. (intransitive) To be naturally disposed to, prone [+infinitive = to do]
  8. (impersonal) It is natural, happens naturally [+infinitive = that …]
  9. to be one’s natural lot [+dative = someone’s]

 


UWAGA! Ofitzjalni jęsykosnaftzy nie znajo i nie rozróżniajo Pra-Słowiańskich rdzeni i słów, jak np. Być / By+C’/T, Byt / By+T, Bywać / By+Wa+C’/T’, Bawić / Ba+Wi+C’/T’, Byk / ByK, Bydło / By+DL”o, itp,.. od Bić / Bi+C’/T’, Bitwa / Bi+T+Wa, itd, patrz poniżej, ale to nie jest i tak istotne, bo słowo Fuck /Fa/o”K i tak NIE POCHODZI OD TYCH RDZENI I SŁÓW!


https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/b%CA%B0uH-

Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/bʰuH-

Proto-Indo-European

Alternative reconstructions

  • *bʰuh₂-[1]

Reconstruction

Some sources such as LIV reconstruct full-grade forms *bʰewh₂- or *bʰweh₂-, on the basis of Italic and Celtic preterite and subjunctive stem.[2] According to Jasanoff, this is unjustified, and the root laryngeal cannot be precisely determined.[3]

Root

*bʰuH- (perfective)

  1. to becomegrowappear

Derived terms

Note: In many descendants, this root formed a suppletive verbal paradigm together with other roots, such as *h₁es- and *h₂wes-.

References

  1. ^ Ringe, Don (2006) From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic, Oxford University Press
  2. ^ Rix, Helmut, editor (2001) Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben [Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, ISBN 3-89500-219-4, page 98-101
  3. ^ Jay JasanoffHittite and the Indo-European Verb, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2003, pages 112, 113

…..


UWAGA! Ofitzjalni jęsykosnaftzy nie znajo i nie rozróżniajo Pra-Słowiańskich rdzeni i słów, jak np. Giń / GiN’, Zgiń / Z+GiN’, Zagiń / Za+GiN’,.. Gnij / G+NiJ, Zgnij / Z+G+NiJ, Zegnij / Ze+G+NiJ,.. Gon / GoN, Goń / GoN’, Zgon / Z+GoN’, Zagon / Za+GoN’, itp,.. patrz poniżej, ale to nie jest i tak istotne, bo słowo Fuck / Fao”K i tak NIE POCHODZI OD TYCH RDZENI I SŁÓW!

UWAGA! Dodatkowo powyższe rdzenie to postacie tzw. kentum, podczas gdy np. Żąć / Z”a”/oN+C’/T’, Rżnąć / R+Z”Na”/oN+C’/T’,.. Znikać / Z+NIK+aC’/T’, Zanikać / Za+NiK+aC’/T’,.. itp to postacie tzw. satem!!! 🙂

UWAGA! Ofitzjalni jęsykosnaftzy nie znajo i nie rozumiejo znaczenia słów Bodziec / BoDz+ieC/T, Bóść /  Bo”S’C’/T’!!!


https://sjp.pwn.pl/sjp/bodziec;2445465.html

bodziec

1. «czynnik wywołujący reakcję organizmu»
2. «okoliczność, zdarzenie, czynnik zachęcające do działania»
• bodźcowy

…..

https://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/bodziec

bodziec (język polski)

wymowa:
IPA[ˈbɔʥ̑ɛʦ̑]AS[boʒ́ec], zjawiska fonetyczne: zmięk. wymowa ?/i
znaczenia:

rzeczownik, rodzaj męskorzeczowy

(1.1) med. czynnik wywołujący pobudzenie receptorówpochodzący ze środowiska zewnętrznego lub ze środowiska wewnętrznegozob. też bodziec (fizjologia) w Wikipedii
(1.2) daw. ostroga
(1.3) przen. podnietazachęta
odmiana:
(1.1)

składnia:
(1.3) bodziec do + D. (czegoś)[1]
synonimy:
(1.3) impuls
wyrazy pokrewne:
(1.1,3) przym. bodźcowy
(1.2) czas. bodnąćbóść
tłumaczenia:
źródła:
  1. Skocz do góry Andrzej Markowski, Jak dobrze mówić i pisać po polsku, Warszawa 2000.

…..

https://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/b%C3%B3%C5%9B%C4%87#pl

bóść (język polski)

byki się bodą (2.1)
wymowa:
wymowa ?/iIPA[buɕʨ̑]AS[buść]
znaczenia:

czasownik przechodni niedokonany (dk. bodnąć)

(1.1) uderzać rogami
(1.2) daw. kłuć
(1.3) przen. kłućboleć

czasownik zwrotny niedokonany bóść się (dk. bodnąć się)

(2.1) uderzać rogami siebie wzajemnie
odmiana:
(1.1–3) [1] koniugacja XI

(2.1) [1] koniugacja XI

przykłady:
(1.1) Jest pasterzemwięc nie raz bodło go bydło.
(1.2) Stolica wynurzała się coraz wyraziściej z sinawej oddali (…) nad (…) zbitą i zacieśnioną masą tynówścianokiendachówbodły niebo wieże strzeliste.[2]
(1.3) Jaki taki gadał miEjpanie Soplica!
Daremnie konkurujeszdygnitarskie progi
Za wysokie na Jacka podczaszyca nogi.
Ja śmiałem sięudającże drwiłem z magnatów
I z córek ichi nie dbam o arystokratów;
Że jeśli bywam u nichz przyjaźni to robię,
A za żonę nie pojmętylko równą sobie.
Przecie bodły mi duszę do żywca te żarty;
[3]
(2.1) Patrzyła jak tłuste tryki bodły się na polanie.
wyrazy pokrewne:
rzecz. bodzenie n
związki frazeologiczne:
(1.2) prawda w oczy bodzie • chleb ludzi bodzie
tłumaczenia:
źródła:
  1. ↑ Skocz do:1,0 1,1 Zygmunt Saloni, Marcin Woliński, Robert Wołosz, Włodzimierz Gruszczyński, Danuta Skowrońska, Słownik gramatyczny języka polskiego na płycie CD, Warszawa, 2012, ISBN 978–83–927277–2-9.
  2. Skocz do góry Henryk Sienkiewicz, Potop
  3. Skocz do góry Adam Mickiewicz, Pan Tadeusz.

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/b%C3%B3%C5%9B%C4%87

bóść

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *bosti.[1]

Pronunciation

Verb

bóść impf (perfective ubóść)

  1. (transitive) to gore, to ram; to attack with the horns; to hit with a pointy object

Conjugation

Related terms

References

  1. ^ Brückner, Aleksander (1927), “bodę”, in Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego (in Polish)

External links

  • bóść in Polish dictionaries at PWN

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/g%CA%B7%CA%B0en-

Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/gʷʰen-

Proto-Indo-European

Root

*gʷʰen- (imperfective)[1][2][3]

  1. to strikeslaykill

Derived terms

  • *gʷʰén-ti ~ *gʷʰn-énti (athematic root present) (see there for further descendants)
  • *gʷʰén-ye-ti (ye-present)
  • *gʷʰn̥-sḱé-ti (sḱe-present)
    • Anatolian: [Term?][11]
      • Hittite: (ku-aš-ke-)(ku-wa-aš-ke-, /kʷəšké-/)
    • Tocharian: *käsk-[12]
  • *gʷʰe-gʷʰón-e ~ gʷʰe-gʷʰn-ḗr (perfect)
    • Celtic: [Term?]
    • Hellenic: [Term?]
    • Indo-Iranian: [Term?]
  • *gʷʰon-éye-ti (causative)
  • *gʷʰé-gʷʰn-e-t (reduplicated aorist)
    • Hellenic: [Term?]
    • Indo-Iranian: [Term?]
      • Iranian: [Term?]
        • Avestan: (nijaγnəṇte, 3pl.pres.mid.ind.)(auuajaγnat̰, 3sg.pres.inj.)
  • *gʷʰén-ti-s ~ *gʷʰn̥-téy-s (striking, beating)
  • *gʷʰn̥-tó-s (slain, killed)
    • Hellenic: *kʷʰətós (see there for further descendants)
    • Indo-Iranian: *ǰʰatás (see there for further descendants)
  • *gʷʰón-o-s[15]
    • Hellenic: [Term?]
      • Ancient Greek: φόνος (phónosmurder)
    • Indo-Iranian: *gʰanás
      • Indo-Aryan: [Term?]
        • Sanskrit: घन (ghanádestroyer, murderer; slaying, murder)
    •  *gʷʰón-ō
    • ⇒ *gʷʰón-yeh₂
  • *gʷʰón-is ~ *gʷʰn̥-y-és[16]

References

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959), “ghen-(ə)-”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume II, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, pages 491-493
  2. ^ Rix, Helmut, editor (2001), “*gʰen-”, in Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben[Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, ISBN 3-89500-219-4, pages 218-219
  3. ^ Cheung, Johnny (2007), “*ǰan”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb(Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 2), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-15496-4, pages 224-225
  4. ^ Demiraj, Bardhyl (1997), “gjúaj”, in Albanische Etymologien: Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz [Albanian Etymologies: Investigaitons into the Albanian Inherited Lexicon] (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 7) (in German), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, pages 191-192
  5. ^ Martirosyan, Hrach (2010), “ǰinǰ-”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 8), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 559
  6. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015), “genėti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 27898 1, pages 170-171
  7. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008), “*žę̀ti II”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 15504 6, page 561
  8. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010), “θείνω”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek(Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), volume I, with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 536-537
  9. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0195083458, § 218
  10. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “-fendō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 210-211: “-fendō was derived either by suffixation of PIE *-d(ʰ)-, or the whole paradigm was derived from an original pr.ipv. sg. *fende*gʷʰn̥dʰi ‘strike!’ (thus LIV).”
  11. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008), “kue(n)-zi / kun- / kuu̯a(n)-”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-16092-7, pages 561-562
  12. ^ Adams, Douglas Q. (2013), “käsk-”, in A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, page 189
  13. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015), “ganyti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 27898 1, page 164
  14. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008), “*gonìti”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978 90 04 15504 6, page 177
  15. ^ Ringe, Don (2006) From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic, Oxford University Press, page 106
  16. ^ Martirosyan, Hrach (2010), “gan”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 8), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 198

…..

Po drugie:

(…) This points to a possible etymology where Common Germanic fuk– comes from an Indo-European root meaning „to strike”, cognate with non-Germanic words such as Latin pugno „I fight” or pugnus „fist”.[7] By application of Grimm’s law, this hypothetical root has the form *pug–(…)

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pugno

Italian

Etymology

From Latin pugnus, from Proto-Italic *pugnos, from Proto-Indo-European  *puǵnos*puḱnos, from *pewǵ-*peuḱ- (prick, punch)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key)/ˈpuɲo/[ˈpuɲ.ɲo]
  • Hyphenation: pù‧gno

Noun

pugno m (plural pugniobsolete plural pugna)

  1. fist
  2. punch
  3. fistfulhandful

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

Verb

pugno

  1. first-person singular present indicative of pugnare

Anagrams

Latin

Etymology

From pugnus (fist), from Proto-Indo-European *puǵ-no-, from  *peuǵ-*peuḱ- (prick, punch).

Pronunciation

Verb

pugnō (present infinitive pugnāreperfect active pugnāvīsupine pugnātum); first conjugation

  1. fightcombatbattleengage.
  2. contendconflictopposecontradict.
  3. endeavourstrugglestrive.

Inflection

Conjugation of pugno (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present pugnō pugnās pugnat pugnāmus pugnātis pugnant
imperfect pugnābam pugnābās pugnābat pugnābāmus pugnābātis pugnābant
future pugnābō pugnābis pugnābit pugnābimus pugnābitis pugnābunt
perfect pugnāvī pugnāvistīpugnāsti1 pugnāvit pugnāvimus pugnāvistispugnāstis1 pugnāvēruntpugnāvēre
pluperfect pugnāveram pugnāverās pugnāverat pugnāverāmus pugnāverātis pugnāverant
future perfect pugnāverō pugnāveris pugnāverit pugnāverimus pugnāveritis pugnāverint
passive present pugnor pugnārispugnāre pugnātur pugnāmur pugnāminī pugnantur
imperfect pugnābar pugnābārispugnābāre pugnābātur pugnābāmur pugnābāminī pugnābantur
future pugnābor pugnāberispugnābere pugnābitur pugnābimur pugnābiminī pugnābuntur
perfect pugnātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect pugnātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect pugnātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present pugnem pugnēs pugnet pugnēmus pugnētis pugnent
imperfect pugnārem pugnārēs pugnāret pugnārēmus pugnārētis pugnārent
perfect pugnāverim pugnāverīs pugnāverit pugnāverīmus pugnāverītis pugnāverint
pluperfect pugnāvissempugnāssem1 pugnāvissēspugnāsses1 pugnāvissetpugnāsset1 pugnāvissēmuspugnāssemus1 pugnāvissētispugnāssetis1 pugnāvissentpugnāssent1
passive present pugner pugnērispugnēre pugnētur pugnēmur pugnēminī pugnentur
imperfect pugnārer pugnārērispugnārēre pugnārētur pugnārēmur pugnārēminī pugnārentur
perfect pugnātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect pugnātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present pugnā pugnāte
future pugnātō pugnātō pugnātōte pugnantō
passive present pugnāre pugnāminī
future pugnātor pugnātor pugnantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives pugnāre pugnāvissepugnāsse1 pugnātūrus esse pugnārī pugnātus esse pugnātum īrī
participles pugnāns pugnātūrus pugnātus pugnandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
pugnāre pugnandī pugnandō pugnandum pugnātum pugnātū

1At least one rare poetic syncopated perfect form is attested.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

See also

References

  • pugno in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pugno in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “pugno”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • pugno” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pugnus

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *pugnos, from Proto-Indo-European *puǵnos*puḱnos, from *pewǵ-*peuḱ- (prick, punch). Near cognates include Ancient Greek  πυγμή (pugmḗfist).

Pronunciation

Noun

pugnus m (genitive pugnī); second declension

  1. fist; a hand with all fingers curled up
  2. fistfulhandful

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%CF%80%CF%85%CE%B3%CE%BC%CE%AE#Ancient_Greek

πυγμή

Ancient Greek

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European. Cognates include Latin pugnus, Lithuanian pušìs, and Old English  fyst (English fist). Compare πύξ (púx) and πεύκη (peúkē).

Pronunciation

Noun

πυγμή  (pugmḗf (genitive πυγμῆς); first declension

  1. fist quotations ▼
    1. boxing quotations ▼
  2. a measure of length, the distance from the elbow to the knuckles (= 18 δάκτυλοι (dáktuloi), about 13.5 inches) quotations ▼

Inflection

See also

Further reading

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%CF%80%CE%B5%CF%8D%CE%BA%CE%B7#Ancient_Greek

πεύκη

Ancient Greek

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *peuk.

Pronunciation

Noun

πεύκη  (peúkēf (genitive πεύκης); first declension

  1. pine
  2. anything made from the wood of the tree, torch of pine-wood
  3. wooden writing-tablet

…..

https://www.etymonline.com/word/*peuk-

*peuk-

also *peug-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning „to prick.”

It forms all or part of: appointappointmentbungcompunctioncontrapuntalexpugnexpungeimpugninterpunctionoppugnpinkpoignantpointpointepointillismponiardpouncepugilismpugilistpugnaciouspugnacitypunch (n.1) „pointed tool for making holes or embossing;”  punch (n.3) „a quick blow with the fist;” punch (v.) „to hit with the fist;” puncheon (n.2) „pointed tool for punching or piercing;” punctiliopunctiliouspunctualpunctuatepunctuationpuncturepungentpuntyPygmyrepugnrepugnancerepugnant.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pyx  „with clenched fist,” pygme „fist, boxing,” pyktes „boxer;” Latin pugnare „to fight,” especially with the fists,  pungere „to pierce, prick.”

Related Entries

See all related words (37)


UWAGA! Czy już widać od jakiego Pra-Słowiańskiego rdzenie i słowa słowa pochodzą i to „łacińskie” pungo i pungus i to tzw. starogreckie pugmḗ, itd?

Czy ktoś ośmiela się podważyć, prawa ofitzjalnego jęsykosnaftzfa? Ja ich nie podważam, ja je rozszerzam i tak rozszerzone wykorzystuję, jako podstawę do rzeczywistych a nie odtworzonych wywiedzeń źródłosłowów.

Tym słowem jest i… Pięść / Pie”/eN’S’C’/T’… i Pięć / Pie”/eN’C’, Pędź / Pe”/eNDz’… i Pięta / Pie”Ta… i Pień / PieN’… i Piąc / Pia”/oNC’/T’… i Pion / PioN… itd!!!

UWAGA! Żeby nie ciągnąć także i tego w nieskończoność przygotuję oddzielny wpis tylko o wywiedzeniu znaczenia słowa Fist / FiST, czyli Pie”/eNS’C’/T’…


 

Oto Pra-Słowiański źródłosłów dla tego tajemniczego słowa Fuck / Fa/o”K:

https://sjp.pl/puka%C4%87

pukać

1. uderzać w coś lekko, powodując powstawanie jakiegoś odgłosu; stukać, kołatać;
2. potocznie: strzelać;
3. pukać się – pukać siebie samego

~gosc # 2011-08-17 w języku staropolskim oznaczało to wypuszczanie gazów z odbytu, np „zabawa w pukanie”

~gosc # 2011-08-17 Nie bój się pięknego słowa „pierdzenie”.

~gosc# 2016-10-16 pukać – uprawiać seks

…..

https://sjp.pwn.pl/slowniki/puka%C4%87.html

pukać

Wielki słownik ortograficzny

pukać -am, -ają

Słownik języka polskiego

puknąć — pukać

1. «uderzywszy lekko czymś w coś, spowodować odgłos»
2. «strzelić z jakiejś broni»
3. «uderzyć o coś, w coś lub uderzyć kogoś»
Słownik języka polskiego pod red. W. Doroszewskiego

Podobne wyszukiwania

Synonimy

…..

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/puka%C4%87

pukać

Polish

Verb

pukać impf (perfective puknąć)

  1. to knock (e.g. on the door)

Conjugation

Reklamy

20 uwag do wpisu “75 Fuck / Fa/o”K,.. czyli skończmy w końcu z tym ofitzjalnym etymologiczeskim pieprzeniem,.. czyli no to jak to było pierwotnie w Pra-Słowiańskim? :-)

  1. Dodatkowo powiązane wg mnie, patrz:

    https://sjp.pl/puchn%C4%85%C4%87

    puchnąć

    1. obrzmiewać, stawać się nabrzmiałym, a w przenośni także: stawać się lub być przepełnionym, zawierać coś w nadmiarze;
    2. tracić kondycję, siły w wyniku nadmiernej aktywności fizycznej, najczęściej w końcowej fazie zawodów

    …..

    https://sjp.pwn.pl/sjp/puchnac;2513238.html

    puchnąć

    1. «stawać się obrzękniętym»
    2. «być przepełnionym»
    3. pot. «słabnąć, zwłaszcza w końcowej fazie jakiegoś wysiłku»

    …..

    https://sjp.pwn.pl/slowniki/puchn%C4%85%C4%87.html

    puchnąć

    Wielki słownik ortograficzny

    puch•nąć -ch•nę, -ch•niesz, -ch•ną; -ch•nął a. -chł, -ch•ła, -ch•li

    Słownik języka polskiego

    puchnąć

    1. «stawać się obrzękniętym»
    2. «być przepełnionym»
    3. pot. «słabnąć, zwłaszcza w końcowej fazie jakiegoś wysiłku»

    Słownik języka polskiego pod red. W. Doroszewskiego

    Synonimy

    puchnąć(od płaczu)

    …..

    https://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/puchn%C4%85%C4%87

    puchnąć


    ręka puchnie (1.1)

    znaczenia:

    czasownik przechodni niedokonany (dk. spuchnąć)

    (1.1) stawać się obrzękniętym
    (1.2) być przepełnionym
    (1.3) pot. tracić siłysłabnąć
    przykłady:
    (1.1) Stary numer polegał na tym kilka godzin przed występem brało się duży kamień i waliło z dziesięciominutowymi przerwami w nadgarstek – czerwieniał i puchł błyskawicznie[1].
    synonimy:
    (1.1) nabrzmiewać
    wyrazy pokrewne:
    czas. spuchnąć
    tłumaczenia:
    źródła:
    1. Skocz do góry Mariusz Sieniewicz, Żydówek nie obsługujemy, 2005, Narodowy Korpus Języka Polskiego.

    Polubienie

  2. http://www.staropolska.pl/slownik/?nr=3570&litera=&id=4492

    Puszyć nadymać, mamić.

    …..

    https://sjp.pl/puszy%C4%87

    puszyć

    1. puszyć (się): stroszyć (się), czynić (się) puszystym;
    2. puszyć się: być dumnym z czegoś, wywyższać się, wynosić się nad innych, pysznić się

    …..

    https://sjp.pwn.pl/sjp/puszyc;2513478.html

    puszyć zob. stroszyć.

    …..

    https://sjp.pwn.pl/sjp/puszyc-sie;2513479.html

    puszyć się

    1. «o ptakach: stroszyć pióra»
    2. «być dumnym i nieprzystępnym»
    …..

    pusza (język polski)

    wymowa:
    IPA[ˈpuʃa]AS[puša]
    znaczenia:

    rzeczownik, rodzaj żeński

    (1.1) bardzo krótki i delikatny włos przy samym ciele drapieżnych zwierząt[1]
    odmiana:
    (1.1)

    etymologia:
    (1.1) niem. Busch[1]
    źródła:
    1. ↑ Skocz do:1,0 1,1 publikacja w otwartym dostępie – możesz ją przeczytać Hasło Pusza w: Słownik języka polskiego, red. Jan Karłowicz, Adam Kryński, Władysław Niedźwiedzki, t. V, s. 441, Warszawa 1900–1927.

    UWAGA! Wg ofitzjalnych jęsykosnaftzóf Pusza / Po”S”a pochodzi od nieieckiego Busch / BuS”, czyli… krzak, no bo Słowianie Puchu / Po”(c)Ho”, ani Puchacza / Po”(c)H+aC”a nie znali,.. patrz:


    https://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/Busch#Busch_.28j.C4.99zyk_niemiecki.29

    Busch (język niemiecki)

    ein Busch (1.2)

    wymowa:
    wymowa ?/i
    lm IPA/bʊʃ/ lm IPA/ˈbʏʃə/
    znaczenia:

    rzeczownik, rodzaj męski

    (1.1) busz
    (1.2) krzakkrzew

    rzeczownik, rodzaj męski lub żeński, nazwa własna

    (2.1) pop. nazwisko Busch
    odmiana:
    (1.1–2)[1]

    (2.1) [2][3]

    (2.1) [4][5]

    synonimy:
    (1.2) Strauchm
    wyrazy pokrewne:
    przym. buschig
    związki frazeologiczne:
    auf den Busch klopfen
    źródła:

    Polubienie